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HOW TO START SAVING 

Save the dimes here, and quarters there, that you 
spend so readily for things you don't really need. 
Most of the Savings Accounts are started in this 
manner. 

f 1 will open an account. 

$3 on Deposit will draw interest. 

Recent Dividends at Rate of 4y2% 

RANDOLPH SAVINGS BANK 

A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OVER 80 YEARS 



WE WISH to thank our advertisers for the manner 
in which they contribute to our advertising department. 
We hope they consider advertising in our magazine 
worth-while. 

HELEN BRENNAN, 
Advertising Manager. 



START EARLY — MAKE THIS YOUR BANK 

DEPOSITS AS LOW AS $1.00 PER MONTH 

SHARES ALWAYS ON SALE 



Randolph Co^^operative Bank 




For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



Oracle Staff 3 

First President 5 

Truthfulness, George Washington, Life, To Stetson High 7 

Jim, The T erribie Turk 9 

Final Nore, Tlioughrs, League Meeting, Difference 11 

League Meeting, Junior and Senior Notes, Alumni 13 

Puzzling, What Would Happen If ? 15 

Athletics 17-19 

Junior Play Program 2l 

Exchanges, "Attention Everybody" 23 

Stetson College, B. B. Election, Who's Who in China .... 25 
Pick-Ups 27-31 





.11 

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NAME OF GEORGE WASHINGTON 

G reat was the hero whose name we shall spell ; 
E ?iger to do his work nobly and well ; 

rderly, too, in all of his ways, 

R ighteous was he, to the end of his days ; 

G ood was he from earliest youth ; 

E arnest his efforts for freedom and truth. 

W ise, with a wisdom sent from above ; 

A rdent his hope for the country we love. 

§ trong was his arm, when in Liberty's fight, 

M onest his purpose that right should be might. 

1 ndomitable was his courage, we know, 
N oble in thought, his worthy deeds show; 
G rand is the record that's left us to read ; 
T rue to his God and his country in need. 
O bedient ever to duty's command ; 

r*!j one was so great in all of the land. 

Louise Brewster, '35. 



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Vol. XV. No. 2 



Stetson High School, Randolph, Mass. 



April 8, 1932 



SINGLE COPIES TWENTY-FIVE CENTS 



ORACLE STAFF 



Asst. Editor 
Ellen CoHEi>r 

Business Manager 
Helen Brennan 

Art Editor 
Francis Finqh 

Alumni 
Rita Nelson 



Edito r-in -Ch ief 
Lloyd W. French 



Literary Editor 
Helen McCarty 

Asst. Business Managers 
Veronica Gaynor, Lee. Mather 

Athletics 
Arvid Anderson 

Jokes 
Eleanor Mulvey 



Junior 
Phoebe Marsh,all 

Sophomore 
Nellie Magnussen 



Not 



es 



Senior 
Bernice Wilbur 

Freshman 
Edna Jope 




STETSON ORACLE 



RANDOLPH TRUST COMPANY 

RANDOLPH, MASS. 

We solicit your savings and checking account. $1.00 ^vill open 
a savings account in our bank. There is no Hmit to the amount 
you may deposit. Interest received on deposits in our savings 
department is free from all town and state taxes. Deposits draw 
interest from the 5th day of each month. $100.00 will allow you 
the privilege of a checking account. 

Capital, $100,000.00 — Surplus and Profit, $125,000.00 
LOUIS E. FLYE, Pres. JAMES V. DONOVAN, Tteas. 



Brockton National Bank 

"The Bank of Security" 

90 MAIN STREET 
Branch at Campello 



STETSON ORACLE 





narare 




THE FIRST PRESIDENT 
Harry John son j '32 
After the smoke of the Revolutionary 
War had cleared, it became apparent to our 
forefathers that they must have a leader— 
a president. It was very natural that all 
eyes should have turned toward George 
Washington, who had won their admira- 
tion and their love, by his military leader- 
ship and his devotion to the cause of the 
United States. I shall not, however, de- 
scribe his military accomplishments, since 
every American is, or should be, familiar 
with them. I shall limit myself to George 
Washington's career as first president of the 
United States, which was to prove even 
more valuable and indispensable to his 
country than had been his services as com- 
mander-in-chief of the American army. 

Unanimously elected to the presidency, 
he was inaugurated on the 4th of March, 
1789, before an enthusiastic audience. 

Washington, faced with immense difficul- 
ties, said, "I walk on untrodden ground; 
there is scarcely any action the motive of 
which may not be subjected to a double 
interpretation ; there is scarcely any part of 
my conduct that may not hereafter be 
drawn into precedent." It was the destiny 
of the "Father of our Country" to create 
with wisdom and foresight the policies of 
the government, to establish earnest rela- 
tions between Congress and himself, and 
to appoint honest and capable judges to 
assist him in the administration of justice. 
Always, in his home at Mount Vernon, in 
the army, and at the Capital, the welfare 
of his beloved country was uppermost m 
his heart. 



He appointed two of the most able 
statesmen in the country to serve in his 
cabinet: Alexander Hamilton and Thomas 
Jefferson. As Secretary of the Treasury, 
Hamilton has had few equals; Thomas 
Jefferson was one of the greatest statesmen 
this country has ever produced. With the 
assistance of these two great cabinet mem- 
bers, Washington's administration worked 
smoothly, despite the fact that the govern- 
ment was new and fraught with many 
dangers. 

At the conclusion of his first term. 
Washington was unanimously re-elected by 
his grateful fellow citizens. So dear was 
he to the hearts of our forefathers, that 
had he said the word they would have 
crowned him king. However, it was his 
wish that this country be a republic, and 
therefore, he unselfishly declined. After 
an equally successful second term, George 
Washington quietly retired to his home on 
the Potomac, and, in compliance with his 
example and desire, no president has since 
served more than two terms. His sincere 
Farewell Address exemplifies his true 
patriotic spirit, and marked his retirement 
from public service. 

We may well look upon the first ad- 
ministration with pride, and upon our first 
president with undying gratitude. Let us, 
therefore, on this, the 200th anniversary 
of his birth, turn back the pages of his- 
tory, that we may once again review, and 
appreciate the nobility of soul, the Avon- 
derful sacrifices, and the passionate devo- 
tion of George Washington to his country. 

^ ^ yf 



STETSON ORACLE 



Miss Alyce Thibault's 
School of Dancing 

Seniors — Why not learn to 

dance properly for the 

Senior Prom? 

Tap Class for Beginners, 

Tuesday at 4:45 P.M. 

Advanced Class, Tuesday at 3 P. M. 



ITE ^ HILL 

Ladies' and Gents' 

FURNISHINGS 

DRY GOODS and NOTIONS 

Infants' Wear and Hosiery 



Main St. 



0pp. P. 0. 



CARTWRKGHT — FUNERAL SERVICE 



RALPH W. CARTWRIGHT 



Telephone RANdolph 0199-R 



North Main Street 



WE FURNISH NATIONAL CASKETS 



Compliments of 


BROOK'S 


Randolph Beauty Shop 


REAL ESTATE 


MARY M. DUFFY, Prop. 


McAuliffe's Block 


McAULIFFE'S BLOCK RAN. 


RANDOLPH MASS. 



Compliments of 



GEORGE V. HIGGINS, M. D. 



STETSON ORACLE 



TRUTHFULNESS 

Seen In the Soplio/ziore English Class 

When one describes things as they are, 
or as they appear to him, he is truthful. 
If he rehites thin<2;s as they are not, he 
is false. 

We must, throughout life, take home to 
ourselves this lesson. Truth was meant for 
man and man was meant for truth. Lan- 
guage is our natural means for telling facts 
to one another. Through it we may know 
the real \\orld in which we live. We must 
obev the laws of Nature. We must con- 
trol our actions so as to make them accord 
with these laws. The most fundamental 
duty of man in all dealings with one an- 
other is to represent things as they are. 
Truth is the first necessity of living. We 
must recognize the facts and laws of our 
human existence and represent them to 
others as they are. This is the only sure 
and lasting foundation of a good and 
happy life. 



Hero of many wars, his last illness was 
brought on b\' a long ride in a blinding 
snowstorm, preparing for an expected war 
with France. He strove to follow this 
motto all through his useful and busy life: 

"Whatever is worth doing at all is worth 
doing well." 

* * * 
LIFE 

Norfjia Burns, '34 
Often the trail is lonely, 

Often the road is rough, 
Men who go through are only 

Those of the sterner stui¥, 
Stalwarts who smile at danger, 

Eager to play their part ; 
Men to whom fear is a stranger. 

Men with the fighting heart. 
Those with their visions splendid. 

Win to the heights of fame. 
And when their da^'s are ended. 

Win for the years, a name. 

* * * 



GEORGE WASHINGTON 

Hazel Harrington, '35 

George Washington was born at Bridge's 
Creek, Westmoreland County, Virginia, 
February 22, 1732. While at school, he 
was painstaking with his work, excelled in 
athletic sports, and often acted as a judge, 
in deciding disputes between his com- 
panions. 

In the early part of his career. Governor 
Dinwiddie chose him to warn the French 
away from the forts they were building 
on the Ohio River. This was a perilous 
undertaking, but Washington accomplished 
it successfully without opposition. On 
April 16, 1789, he was inaugurated Presi- 
dent and served two terms. He refused 
to serve a third, but retired to Mt. Ver- 
non in 1797. 



Job for the Ghost 
It's not much to think of — 

But every now and then — 
I wonder where M. Gandhi 

Carries his fountain pen ! 



* * 



* 



TO STETSON HIGH 
Ernia L. Goody, '32 
How many happy hours we've spent 

At Stetson, day by day ! 
That is the school Avhich we all love, 

\io\v much I need not say. 
Those hours we've spent in play and fun. 

But most we've spent in work, 
Our homework, too, was given us, 

AVhich we could never shirk. 
We'll soon be leaving this fine school, 

^Vith hope or maybe fear. 
But memories of Stetson High 

Will ever be most dear, 



STETSON ORACLE 



CompVunents of 

McCarthy 

THE BARBER 



Compliments of 

RHOLF'S .:. FLOWERS 

Telephone Connection 

69 Mill Street 
Randolph Mass. 



Compliments of 



JOSEPH T. LEAHY 



INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


CROWD'S 


FRANK DIAUTO 


BARBER SHOP 


RANGE 


314 North Main Street 


AND FUEL OILS 


RANDOLPH 


Randolph Mass. 



Compliments of 



i i 



NEEDA'^ LUNCH 



NORTH MAIN STREET 



RANDOLPH 



STETSON ORACLE 




JIM 

Margaret Joyall, '34 

When Dorothy's mother received the in- 
vitation to take a trip to the White 
Mountains with the Smiths, she wired to 
Dorothy's aunt to come and stay with the 
children while she was gone. The aunt 
arrived and then the fun began. 

One Tuesday morning, while Dorothy 
was putting on her middy blouse and cot- 
ton stockings, she uttered the innocent re- 
mark, "I wish I could wear silk stockings 
for gym today." Her aunt was shocked. 
To think that a girl of today could be so 
bold as to put on silk stockings for a young 
man. 

"Well," said the aunt firmly to herself, 
"I shall see that she doesn't wear them 
while I am in charge." 

"And don't I hate middies," continued 
Dorothy. "Wish I could wear my new 
dress." At this the aunt left the room. 

The next morning her aunt placed a 
neatly starched middy and a pair of cot- 
ton stockings on Dorothy's chair. Dorothy 
stared at them. A middy on Wednesday! 
Her aunt did not know what days were 
gym days. But when Dorothy went to the 
closet to get her new dress, she found her 
aunt there to bar the way. 

"You'd better wear your middy today, 
Dorothy," her aunt said strangely. Dor- 
othy did. 

On the way to school, Dorothy told her 
brother her tale of woe. 

She was living in a topsy-turvy world of 
middies on Thursday. That night as 



Dorothy was helping her aunt with the 
dishes, they were interrupted by a cheery 
voice from the hall. Dorothy's mother en- 
tered the kitchen. The aunt sighed — a 
great weight lifted from her shoulders. 
She retired early and left Dorothy and her 
brother talking. "You must talk in your 
sleep, for aunty said that you wanted to 
wear your new dress for Jim," said Dor- 
othy's brother. "Oh," shrieked Dorothy, 
"that's why she kept me in middies and flat 
heels. She thought GYM was a JIM." 

* * * 

THE TERRIBLE TURK 

George Harris 

Standing in his corner in a red bathrobe 
and cap, the Terrible Turk scowled at his 
adversary, the bronzed young giant. Doctor 
Len Hall. Before the echo of the bell had 
died away, "the Turk" let out a frightful 
scream that raised the ringside patrons off 
their benches. Grasping Hall, he proceeded 
to put an "airplane whirl" on him. In- 
stead of the usual slam at the end of the 
whirl, "the Turk" staggered to the ropes 
and heaved Hall about four rows back into 
the crowd. Hall, though slightly dazed, 
came back fighting, and threw about four 
flying tackles onto "the Turk," who was 
by that time rather "groggy." Hall then 
started to give the terrible one the "spread," 
the worst punishing hold in wrestling. 
Standing on the "Turk's" right ankle. Hall 
put the "Turk's" other foot over his shoul- 
der and straightened up. The "Turk," in 
terrible agony, with clenched hands rent the 
smoky air with scream after scream. To 



10 



STETSON ORACLE 



PORTER'S PHARMACY 

Frank J. Rostron, Reg. Phar. 

Fine Line of 
CANDY AND CIGARS 



X^^ -^-^ fc^^. ^TJ:^-- 



Compliments of 

FRANK C. WALSH 

GROCERIES, NOTIONS 
PAINTS AND HARDWARE 



Tel. 0020 



No. Main St. 



LENDING LIBRARY 



■««*><»<aH#*-iS£i;» 



Prescriptions 
Carefully Compounded 



Tel. Ran. 0070 



RANDOLPH 



MASS. 



NORTH MAIN STREET 
GARAGE 

WILLYS-KNIGHT 

WHIPPET 

Sales and Service 

BATTERIES — TIRES 

Tel. Day 0012 Night 534-M 



Compliments of 

F. J. CURRAN 

High Grade 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 

Sheet Metal Work 
RANDOLPH MASS. 



CompJ'nnents of 

BOSS!, THE TAILOR 

Special Prices on 

SUITS AND OVERCOATS 

Cleaning, Pressing and 

Repairing 



RANDOLPH 



MASS. 



H. A, 

FILLING STATION 

Guaranteed Batteries — Good Gulf Products 

"POOLE S FOR SERVICE" 

Telephone RANdolph 0079-W 



STETSON ORACLE 



11 



top this off, Hall leaned down and pulled 
liandful after handful of hair from the 
"Turk's" chest. When the thirty-minute 
time limit was closed, I think the "Turk" 
was well satisfied to get out of that squared 

circle alive. 

* * * 

FINAL NOTE 

Ellen Cohen, '32 

Josef Kran was an infant prodigy, not, 
as yet, acclaimed by great musicians. 

It was the recital of Josef's piano 
teacher, and the hall was crowded to the 
doors. Everything was quiet. Josef, a 
dark little boy, with something appealing 
and almost feminine in his face, and with 
a head finely shaped, but too large for his 
body, appeared on the platform. He had 
an awkward, jerky way of moving that 
made him look smaller than he was. 

The boy squirmed into his chair, and 
began playing Beethoven's "Moonlight 
Sonata." In five minutes, he had his audi- 
ence breathless. They could see that 
Josef's heart and soul were in the music. 
They forgot to be skeptical or even critical. 

In a long flourish of difficult chords, 
Josef played the final notes. He made a 
jerky bow, and left the stage. 

The audience clamored: "Encore! En- 
core ! 

No Josef appeared. 

"Encore! Encore!" 

In the anteroom, the acknowledged 
prodigy, Josef Kran, had succumbed to a 
heart attack as a result of the way in which 
he had played his piece. 

* » * 

THOUGHTS 
H. M. Richards, '35 
I like to think when I am gone 

My friends will all be sad. 
I hope in darkest black they'll mourn 

For me the friend they had. 
I wonder how they'll get along 

When I can't do my share, 
I fear that things will go quite wrong, 

When after Fame, I fare. 



LEAGUE MEETING 
On Wednesday, January 20, eight mem- 
bers of the "Oracle" staff, accompanied by 
Miss Gavin, attended the second meeting 
of the S. M. L. S. P., held at Rockland 
High School, Rockland. The meeting was 
well attended by representatives of the 
various schools who greatly enjoyed the 
hospitality and good time given by the staff 
of the "Green Parrot." First, of course, 
came the departmental meetings which 
were followed by some very interesting 
Alumni speakers. Many cheers and yells 
enlivened the supper which was served in 
the cafeteria. At seven o'clock the busi- 
ness meeting was held, after which Mr. 
Francis "Tip" O'Neil of the Boston 
American talked to us. We all enjoyed 
him very much, and also the play which 
was presented by the Literary Club of the 
school. We especially enjoyed the per- 
formance of "Como," the husband of the 
Amazon Queen. We all had such an en- 
joyable time that we are looking forward 
to the March meeting to renew acquain- 
tances made in Rockland. 



A DIFFERENCE 
Clara Boothby, '34 

Some Sophs never look happy 

And some Sophs never look gay, 
They are wondering what their marks 
will be 

On the coming examination day. 
But some Sophs never woriy 

And some Sophs never fret. 
They've a different idea of life. 

Never fear they'll get there yet. 

* * * 

Josephine Gaynor went into a bookstore 
where Stanley Nelson was clerking. 

Joe G. : "I would like to buy a good 
racy book." 

Nelson: "Certainly, Miss, certainl3\ 
How about 'The Four Horsemen'?" 



12 



STETSON ORACLE 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



BYRON^S DRUG STORE 






Compliments of 


85 North Main St. 




RANDOLPH - MASS. 


STETSON HIGH 


The Store of Quality and Service 




Two Telephones, Ran. 0615-0655 


LUNCH COUNTER 


Open from 8 A. M. to 11 P. M. 






Mrs. Harris — Manager 


WE DELIVER 





Compliments of 



MEYERS' TRANSPORTATION CO. 



BOSTON 



NEW YORK 



GRADUATION PORTRAITS — QUALITY PHOTOGRAPHS 



RAND STUDIO 



153 Main Street, Brockton 



Telephone 7740 



STETSON ORACLE 



13 



LEAGUE MEETING AT 
NORWOOD 

The Stetson High School "Oracle" was 
represented at the Southeastern Massachu- 
setts Association of School Publications 
meeting, at Norwood High School, on 
Wednesday, March 16, 1932, by Miss 
Dorothy Gavin, faculty advisor ; Lloyd 
French, editor-in-chief; Lee Mather, busi- 
ness manager; Helen Brennan and 
Veronica Gaynor, advertising managers; 
Ellen Cohen, exchange editor; Arvid An- 
derson, athletic editor. 

The meeting opened with a welcome by 
Mr. Archibald, principal of Norwood High 
School. Then the delegates adjourned to 
their respective departmental meetings for 
an hour of discussion. Following this, the 
representatives gathered in the gymnasium 
and nominated officers for the ensuing year. 
The cafeteria of the school was a scene of 
general interest for the next hour and one- 
half, and Stetson was noticeably present, 
as evidenced by their superior cheering 
ability. At the business meeting. Stetson 
High was asked to be entertainers at one 
of the league meetings next year, and, at 
the same time, they were chosen on the 
committee for suggestions on the business 
end of the school magazines, along with 
several other high schools. For entertain- 
ment, the Norwood High School Dramatic 
Club presented the play, "Crinoline and 
Candlelight," which was followed by danc- 
ing in the gym, to the strains of the Nor- 
wood High Dance Orchestra. 

The students all left for their respective 
homes, feeling very grateful for the hos- 
pitality shown them by their friendly hosts. 

* * * 

Mahoney: "One time a cabbage, a to- 
mato can, and a hydrant had a race. Who 
won i 

Fitz: "I don't know. Tell me." 
Mahoney: "The cabbage came ahead, 
the tomato is trying to ketchup, and the 
hydrant is still running!" 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR 
CLASS NOTES 

The Seniors received their class rings in 
March. The rings were purchased at the 
Balfour Jewelry Company, Attleboro,- and 
are most unique in their design. 

Margaret Murphy, better known as 
"Peg," and who is a member of the Senior 
Class, won the beauty contest, held in East 
Randolph, on March 17. 
* * * 

ALUMNI 
Talk of the Town 
Walter Winch ell, Jr. 

Let's all get aboard the S. H. S. magic 
carpet and take a flying trip to Boston, 
Mass., where we will find Randolf Phil- 
brook, of the Class of 1925, attending 
Harvard Medical School ; Dorothy Hoeg, 
of the Class of 1926, working at the Cities 
Service Refining Company; Isabel McLea, 
secretary to the president of the Equity 
Trust Co., Mary McDermott, with Jor- 
dan Marsh Co., Lillian Yates, with an in- 
surance company, all of the Class of 1928;. 
Laura Lutton, with the John Aynslie Co., 
Celia McFadden, in a hairdressing school, 
these two of the Class of 1929; Thomas 
Hoye, of the Class of 1930, at the Co- 
servatory of A/tusic ; Janet Dolan, Clement 
Taylor and Edna Johansen, of the Class 
of 1931, attending schools of higher edu- 
cation. O — Kay ! Boston ! 

Now here we are back home again in 
good old Randolph, where whom do I see 
but Anna Tucker, of the Class of 1926, 
Irene Goody, Elizabeth Doyle and Dorothy 
Bcothby, of the Class of 1927, all become 
teachers in the old home town; Mary 
Duffy, of the Class of 1929, who is run- 
ning a beauty shop in the hope of making 
others as cute as herself; Walter Henry, 
of the Class of 1930, John Baldner, Gil- 
bert Boyer and Philip Bo^le, of the Class 
of 1931, all displaying their native courtesy 
by working as clerks. The Classes of 1930 
and 1931 seem to have had some very 
polite 3'oung men ! 



14 



STETSON ORACLE 



Complimejits of 



ATHERTON'S GARAGE 



Tel. 260 



IDEAL LUNCH 

HOME COOKING 

Frank Keith, Prop. 

New Location — No. Main St. 



180 So. Main St. 



Randolph 



Tel. 0745 



Randolph 



BLANCHE DEAN 

HAIRDRESSER 

Cut Prices on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday for School Girls 

Except on Holidays or Days Before 

Everything Done at Your Convenience 



81 NORTH ST. 



TEL. 0735 



Compliments of 


WM. F. MAGUIRE, 
D. M. D. 


CHARLES E. WELLS, 


Closed Wed. Afternoon 


M. D. 


Open Evenings — Sundays 


Tel. 0710 


By Appointment 




Masonic Block Tel. 0547-W 


15 UNION ST. RANDOLPH 


RANDOLPH 



& CO. 

FLORIST 

Designing and Potted Plants A Specialty 
Flowers For All Occasions — Delivered Anywhere 



431 WEST ST. 



RANDOLPH, MASS. 



STETSON ORACLE 



15 



Now to board our magic carpet again 
and Hy through the snowy air 'way up to 
Maine in the cold, cold north, where we 
find Roy Gavin, of the Class of 1929, and 
John Porter, of the Class of 1931 at the 
University of Maine, in Orono. We won- 
der if either of these boys will develop into 
a second Rudy Vallee. In the far north 
we also find John Mulvej^ of the Class of 
1930, attending Castine Normal School, 
Cast'ne. O — Kay! Maine! 

Now to Bridgewater, Mass., where we 
w^ill find four of our Alumni attending 
studiously (we hope) Bridgewater Normal 
School and trying to become those creatures 
whom they so hated a few years ago — 
teachers, Hugh Heney, of the Class of 
1928, Glenda Gavin of 1929 and Mildred 
Forrest and Anna Ginnety of the Classes 
of 1931 and 1930 respectively. O — Kay! 
Bridgewater! 

Now to sail clear down to the tip of 
the Cape, where all that holds the land 
frcm the grasp of the sea is Provincetown, 
and here we will find Eleanor Kelley of 
the Class of 1927 teaching in Province- 
town High School. Yes, they do have 
High Schools down there, and good ones, 
too. 

And now, having boxed the compass, we 
shall let our magic carpet rest until the 
next issue of that great and well-known 
paper, "The Stetson Oracle." 
Yours truly, 

Walter Winchell, Jr. 



WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF? 

Ed. Conley forgot to comb his hair. 

Ellis (Cupcake) Jenkins knew his les- 
sons. 

William Mahoney decided to take danc- 
ing lessons. 

Veronica Gaynor cheered for the Tighers' 
football team. 

T. Pignatelli didn't dream of sports. 

D. Doyle didn't know his chemistry 
lesson. 

J. ]\Iulhall forgot to wear his knickers. 

V. Marcille kept quiet in the singing 
class. 

Will Foley didn't have an argument 
over geometry. 

Mike Tedeschi created an uproar in 
class. 

Arvid Anderson got to school on time. 

Charlie Crovo forgot his paper. 

The juniors kept quiet for a change. 

E. Tucker became like Einstien. 

V. Pignatelli didn't play the piano at 
recess. 

A Helping Hand. 

* * * 

We have a Cole but no "wood. 

We have a Gardener but no tools. 

We have a Campbell but no soup. 

We have a Purdy but no photographer. 

We have a Steel but no iron. 

We have a Rowe but no oars. 

We have a Fisher but no bait. 



* * * 

PUZZLING? 

Anonyvious 
Who can say 
Why today 

Tomorrow will be yesterday? 
Who can tell 
Why to smell 

The violets recalls dewy prime 
Of youth and burned time? 
The cause is nowhere found in rhyme. 



The Freshmen wonder what would hap- 
pen if: 

Ruth Sullivan forgot to powder her nose. 

Latin was easj''. 

Sylvia C. didn't get all "A's." 

Ruth Walsh wasn't late. 

Beatrice ]\I. wasn't smiling. 

Lena C. wasn't funny. 

Natalie didn't have a boy friend. 

Phyllis D. \Aas a blonde. 

Eleanor C. did her homelessons. 

We didn't have exams, 



16 



STETSON ORACLE 



CARL'S 


WREN^S 


Service Station 


Fimeral Home 




51 NORTH ST. RANDOLPH 


733 SOUTH MAIN ST. 


0pp. Short St. 


RANDOLPH 


Tfil. Randolph 0345 


Quaker State and 




Pennzoil, — The Best 


Coynpliments of 


TIRES TUBES 


STETSON THEATRE 


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STETSON ORACLE 



17 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

Miss Gavin, coach of the girls' basket- 
ball team, was faced with the problem of 
building a new team. She obtained good 
results, as her proteges won four and tied 
one, in a schedule of twelve games. The 
margin of victory for the opponents was 
very slight in some of the games and the 
issue undecided until the first whistle had 
blown. 

Misses Virginia Guidice and Hattie 
Saunders developed into two very fine 
guards. Captain Veronica Gaynor was al- 
ways in the fight in her pet position as 
side center and Miss Helen Porter played 
her usual fine game as a center. The for- 
wards, Anna Sullivan, Isabelle Gaynor, 
Blanche Drummond and Ruth Tweed, 
chalked up many points between them. 

The entire squad consisted of Misses V. 
Gaynor, H. Porter, B. Drummond, L 
Gaynor, A. Sullivan, R. Tweed, V. 
Guidice, H. Saunders, E. Fischer, E. 
Rhodes, L. Brewster, M. Harris, L. Boyle, 
A. Doyle, N. Sullivan, M. Collins, C. 
Scanlon. IMiss Mary McGrory worked 
hard as manager. She was ably assisted 
by IVIiss Helen Brennan. 

Breakin' Even 
The battle between the Sumner and 
Stetson girls was a nip and tuck affair 
until the end. Superb guarding by oppos- 
sing backs was a feature of the game in 
which both sets of basket tossers were un- 
questionably out of form. Sumner stood 



out at the front at the half, with a 18-16 
lead. 

The second stanza was a repetition of 
the first. The home girls missed many 
shots in this half, which would undoubtedly 
have led to a victory if they had been 
successful. 

With only a matter of seconds before 
the curtain would be drawn on this strug- 
gle, Miss Gaynor swished the pill through 
the hoop for a basket. This surged Ran- 
dolph ahead but Miss Walsh of Holbrook 
quickly followed with a sweet shot which 
tied the score just as the game ended. 
Final score: 30-30. 

Games and results were as follows: 
Stetson — 30 West Bridgewater — 40 



Stetson 


38 


Sharon — 


27 


Stetson 


— 46 


Bridgewater — 


24 


Stetson 


— 17 


Holbrook — 


20 


Stetson 


28 


Braintree — 


39 


Stetson 


22 


Hingham — 


27 


Stetson 


5 


Bridgewater — 


37 


Stetson 


45 


Taunton — 


13 


Stetson 


24 


Sharon — 


28 


Stetson 


30 


Holbrook — 


30 



* * * 

BOYS' BASKETBALL 

Stetson High School's unimpressive rec- 
ord for the past hoop season may be ac- 
counted for by many reasons. The team 
faced the toughest schedule in the history 
of the school without any pre-eseason 
practice or coach, and with several of 
the experienced players ineligible because 



18 



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STETSON ORACLE 



19 



of scholastic difficulties. As a result, the 
first six games were dropped by a large 
margin. 

When the "ineligibles" were reinstated, 
the boys proceeded to wallop the favored 
"Sumner High Quintette" on their home 
floor. Hardly had Stetson slid back into 
its early season form when it was sub- 
merged by Braintree High. Again the 
team rallied and Boston College High In- 
dependents were easy victims of the re- 
vamped Randolph machine. Hingham's 
fast outfit nosed the team out by virtue of 
the tremendous lead which they piled up 
in the first half. The boys made a fierce 
attempt to even up the count, although 
Hingham had a fifteen point margin. The 
whistle ended a rally which promised to 
bring victory for Stetson. Final score: 
40-35. 

Mansfield High Cagers drubbed us for 
the second time in a game featured with 
poor shooting on the part of the home lads. 

Determined that past defeats were to be 
forgotten. Captain Archer and his boys 
took the last three teams on schedule into 
camp. 

The Kind Onb Reads About 

Stetson piled up a 16-8 lead in the first 
half of the game with Sharon at Sharon 
High gym. Sharon came back strong in 
the third stanza and the count stood 16 
all at the end of the period. Nugent, of 
the home lads, put Sharon in the lead with 
a sensational basket and Victor Pignatelli 
put joy into the hearts of the Randolph 
rooters by swishing one through the drap- 
eries. It looked as if an overtime period 
would have to be played but Captain 
Archer arched one through the net when 
only five seconds remained before the end 
of the game. 

The year's squad consisted of Victor 
"Red" Pignatelli, Russel "Russ" Swallow, 
Thomas "T" Brennan, Raymond "Ray" 
McGrory, Tony "Half-Pint" Pignatelli, 
Joseph "Ducky" Murphy, forwards; Arvid 



"Andy" Anderson, Arthur "Art" Connors, 
Ellis "Cupcake" Jenkins, David "Dave" 
Doyle, Howard Robbins, guards; Captain 
Frank Archer, center. Stanley Nelson did 
a fine job as manager. He was assisted by 
Alfred Lynch and Francis Nowlan. 

Games and results were as follows: 
Stetson — 5 West Bridgewater — 25 

Stetson — 13 Hingham — 31 

Abington — 76 

Sharon 44 

Mansfield — 36 

Bos. Sch. for Deaf — 45 
Holbrook— 19 

Braintree — 35 

Hingham — 40 

B. C. H. Indepts. — 26 
Mansfield — 44 

Sharon — 18 

Bos. Sch. for Deaf— 19 
Holbrook— 17 



Stetson — 14 
Stetson — 11 
Stetson — 13 
Stetson — 15 
Stetson — 29 
Stetson — 16 
Stetson — 35 
Stetson — 42 
Stetson — 33 
Stetson — 20 
Stetson — 29 
Stetson — 23 



* * « 
SPORT NOTES 

Melvin McGonnigle, ex-Stetson foot- 
ball, basketball and baseball star, has been 
recently elected captain of the hockey team 
for the coming year at Williston Academy, 
Easthampton, Mass. McGonnigle, or 
"Melly," as he is known to his colleagues, 
was the boy who pitched the no-hit, no-run, 
no-pass game against Middleboro last year, 
when he captained the Stetson team. 

IVIcGonnigle has also starred in football 
at Williston Academy and is a prospect for 
the pitcher's position on this year's ball 
team. 

Frank Archer, captain of this year's bas- 
ketball team, was named as one of the finest 
players at the South Shore High School 
Basketball Tournament at the Brockton 
Y. M. C. A. He rated eight among 
the 144 boys in scoring. 

Owen Kiernan, forward on last year's 
basketball squad, was instrumental in mak- 
ing his freshman class team at Bridgewater 
Normal School, school champions. 



20 



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STETSON ORACLE 21 



JUNIOR PLAY PROGRAM 

Address of Welcome President Junior Class, Edward Conley 

Orchestra Selections Paul Murphy's Troubadours 

' Popular Songs Howard and Warren Robbins 

Tap Dancing Virginia Guidice 

"The Felton Mystery" 

Harvey Felton, chairman of the Hospital Fund Henry Anderson 

John Gild, a business associate David Doyle 

Oswald, the butler, employed by Gild Edward Conley 

Fred Lawson, the detective making the investigation Edwin Burchell 

Eleanor Gild, John s luife, a charming lady Anna Condon 

Jane Felton, Harvey's wife, who has a secret Evelyn Allen 

Ruth Haller, assistant detective to Lawson Isabelle Gaynor 

Dinah, colored maid of Gild's with a sense of humor Mary O'Brien 

Helen Stimson, a chemist, and friend of Miss Haller Agnes Brennan 

Vera Temple, a young lady in love Mary Kelleher 

Dancing Until Twelve 

i 

:.»:«x~x»»XK»^x«<~x*^<»«x«<K*<*<»<«<*»x*<»«x*<"X»<^<K*<»<'<**x«<«^ 



22 



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While You Wait 

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Office: 105 Main St. 
Tel. 0166-M 



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Tel. Day 0745 


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C. H, SAUNDERS 




GROCERIES PROVISIONS 


Paul L. M. Rocatis, Prop. 


MEATS 


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AUTHORIZED FORD DEALERS 

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David J. Walter J. 



RANDOLPH 0189 
Thomas J. 



STETSON ORACLE 



23 



"Hello there, 
I haven't seen 

; ! What are 



ATTENTION EVERYBODY! 

Scene: A country road in Randolph. 
Tiime: A winter's afternoon in 1932. 
Characters: Abraham Lincoln and 
George Washington. 

Lin (enthusiastically) : 
Georgie! Goodness me. 
you for years and years." 

Wash: "Abe, as I live 
you doing here?" 

Lin: "I've been making a tour of the 
United States and Randolph is the big 
tow^n that is my present stop." 

Wash: "Were there any places in par- 
ticular that you visited?" 

Lin: "I went to Stetson High, this 
morning." 

Wash: "Oh, you did? That's quite an 
interesting school; isn't it?" 

Lin: "Uh-huh! 1 happened to be look- 
ing over the school papers that the ex- 
change editor received from the various 
schools, and believe me, I found some won- 
derful work in them." 

Wash: "I'd like to hear w^hat you have 
to say about them." 

Lin: "The first paper that I picked up 
was the 'Sachem' from Middleboro, and I 
noticed that they could have had a little 
more school news in the line of pickups." 
Wash: "I'm sure they can easily remedy 
that'." 

Lin: "And in the 'Student's Pen' from 
Bridgewater High School, I saw a very 
well-written story on 'Souvenirs from 
Mount Vernon.' Evidently someone must 
have visited your old home." 

Wash (blushing) : "Oh, don't flatter 
me. The United States is making a fuss 
about my bicentennary birthday, and I 
don't know why they should. Continue, 
Abe — what other papers did you see?" 

Lin: "In the 'Semaphore,' from Stough- 
ton, I noticed that the Athletics come at 
the beginning. It would have looked bet- 
ter placed at the end. A little more in the 
literary department would have made the 



magazine somewhat larger." 

Wash: "Did you see the 'Brocktonia'?" 
Lin: "Did I? I'll say I did, and there 
isn't anything that I can say that would 
give it too much praise. It is one of the 
most complete papers that I have seen in 
all my experience." 

Wash: "You don't say! That must 
make the students at B. H. S. feel proud. 
And how about the 'Echo' from Hol- 
brook?" 

Lin: "It seems that the literary depart- 
ment is quite small, but the rest of the 
edition is complete in comparison to the 
size of Sumner High School." 

Wash: "A few more stories, Holbrook!" 
Lin: "That's the idea. In the 'Unquity 
Echo' from Milton High, there is a unique 
exchange department but not enough class 
pick-ups. The 'Wampatuck' from Brain- 
tree was another complete magazine. I 
enjoyed the joke about Mr. Murphy and 
Puggy immensely." 

Wash: "What was it?" 
Lin: "Mr. Murphy: 'What was the 
greatest character the Finns have contri- 
buted to the world'?" 

"Puggy: 'Huckleberry'!" 
Wash: "That was funny! Did you see 
any of the papers from the Boston High 
Schools?" 

Lin: "I mustn't forget the 'Tradesman' 
from Boston High School of Commerce. I 
particularly noticed that it contained no 
table of contents, and that the exchanges 
were missing. The cartoons were attrac- 
tive. And — judging by the 'Abhis,' every- 
one in Abington likes long stories." 

Wash: "My! My! Stetson has quite an 
exchange, hasn't it?" 

Lin: "There was just one more. That 
was the 'Long Pointer' from 'way down on 
the Cape at Provincetown. The business 
managers must be commended for the at- 
tractive way they have of setting up their 
ads. Good for you, P. H. S. !" 

Wash : "It's getting late, and Martha 
must be looking for me now. I'm sorry I 



24 



STETSON ORACLE 





CHARLES O. PORTER 




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Toasted Frankforts and Rolls 


SHEEHAN FURNITURE 


Producers' Ice Cream 


BROCKTON 

: 1 


At Randolph-Avon Line 


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Compliments of 



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MAIN STREET 



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SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 



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( 


Compliments of 


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THE ARLMONT 


James S. Stewart, Reg. Phar. 


TEA ROOM 


NO. MAIN ST., RANDOLPH 

1 


For a Real Treat 
88 Main St., (Brockton 


Telephone 0182 


Next to Brockton National Bank 



STETSON ORACLE 



25 



can't stay and talk any lon<2;er. I cer- 
tainly am glad all the High Schools have 
such fine papers and I hope they keep up 
the good work. Goodbye, Abe!" 

Lin: "So long, Georgie, maybg I'll see 
you again in another hundred years or so!" 

(Curtain). 

Ellen Cohen, '32. 

We are glad to acknowledge the receipt 
of "The Pringry Record" and the "Massa- 
chusetts Collegian." 

* * * 

Said the chamber maid to the sleeping 
guest : 

"Get up, you lazy sinner, 
We need the sheet for a tablecloth, 

There's company for dinner." 

* * * 

STETSON COLLEGE 

Veronica Gaynor, '32 

Stetson High School may now be con- 
sidered on a level with the colleges of our 
country, according to some of the members 
of this great institution. A great many 
students are working hard and are striving 
for degrees which they hope to receive from 
our school. Below are a few degrees that 
have already been endowed on our pupils: 

"Beulah" Mahoney, B. A., Big Attrac- 
tion. 

"Bud" French, A. M., Airplane Me- 
chanic. 

"Ed" Connolly, B. S., Brunette Sheik. 

Ellis Jenkins, M. D., Movie Director. 

"Vinny" Marceille, L. D., Lonesome 
Democrat. 

"Bob" McEntee, B. S., Big Shot. 

Helen Brennan, B. B. A., Big Business 
Aristocrat. 

"The Orchestra," M. B.'s, Bum Musi- 
cians. 

Russell Swallow, B. S., Battling Sailor. 

David Doyle, Ph. D., Demon in Physics. 

* * * 

And now for the interior decorator's 
song: "Just One More Chintz." 



BASKEl'BALL TEAMS ELECT 

Captain Frank Archer has been unani- 
mouslv chosen captain of next year's bas- 
ketball team. Archer, who is a member 
of the Junior Class, has played on the team 
three years, and has served as captain this 
past season. He was one of those given 
honorable mention in the South Shore 
League games as one of the best centers 
who played. Henry Anderson, '33, was 
elected student manager. 

Miss Anna Sullivan, '34, is given the 
honor to captain the girls' basketball team, 
during next year's season. Her snappy 
pass work and general all-around play has 
earned her the distinction of an excellent 
player. Louise Boyle, also of the Sopho- 
more Class, will be the manager. 

* * * 

WHO'S WHO IN CHINA 

Flo\'d Gibbons, international American 
reporter in the war zone, informs us that 
there are a great number of Stetson girls 
who are taking active part in the war. For 
instance: Helen Brennan is commander of 
the American battleship "Nona," which 
contains a crew of women. Veronica Gay- 
nor, with her dog Rex, is constantlj^ seen 
driving an ambulance, with Ellen Cohen 
as field doctor placing the M^ounded men 
and women in the truck. In camp head- 
quarters may be seen Helen Porter knit- 
ting stockings for the soldiers. The poor, 
groaning wounded are well taken care of 
by Eleanor Mulvey and Helen McCarty. 
Grace Ginnetty is a canteen woman, and 
she gives many descriptions of suffering on 
the battlefield. 

Claire Powers is an actress hired by the 
United States Government to entertain the 
wounded. She is an impersonator. 

As escorts, each girl brought a pet. 
There are approximately twenty cats and 
three dogs at the port. It's quite difficult 
to keep the animals from fighting. 

Stetson also has a few efficient spies 
whose names we are not allowed to reveal. 



26 



STETSON ORACLE 



R. E. O'BRIEN 




PLUMBING 


Compliments of 


and 




HEATING 


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Tel. 124-J Randolph 





CompVunetits of 



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Compliments of 

WINER'S 

General Hardware 

Store 



Tel. 0003 



Randolph 



Compliments of 



FRESH MEATS 

and 
VEGETABLES 



Tel. 041-R 



Randolph 



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MANUFACTURERS OF ICE CREAM 
Wholesale and Retail 



Telephone Randolph 470-W 



PLANT, SCHOOL ST. 
Boyle's 



HOLBROOK, MASS. 
Porter's 



STETSON ORACLE 



27 




Hello, everybody! This is the "Two Lov- 
eys" broadcasting from station S-L-A-M 
located at Stetson High School, Randolph. 
We are about to broadcast the latest news 
of the day, although some people call it 
"slams" instead of "news." Well, anyway, 
whatever it is, we're going to get what 
we're thinking, off "our chests," and let 
the whole school in on it, so here goes ! 

Many members of the student body are 
commenting on the manner in which 
"Tapper" Tweed is snubbing "Izzy" Gay- 
nor. Maybe it's a case of jealousy. One 
never knows. 

Helen Brennan is contemplating on en- 
tering Bryant and Stratton Business Col- 
lege. "Spider" goes there, that may help 
things along, will it, Lovey? 

"A good boy is hard to find," but who 
wants a good boy anyway, Bool ah? Thank 
heavens, you don't live up to that slogan. 

"Here's to love, the only fire against 
which there is no insurance." If some of 
the girls in the Commercial Senior group 
don't look out, their life insurance will be 
running out. 

A 1931 Cadillac has been seen going 
through the streets of Randolph, lately. It 
stopped one night at the basketball game 
between Stetson and Sharon. It proved to 
be a group of loyal supporters from a 
neighboring city. 

Let's pause here a minute. Lovey wants 
you listeners to solve this problem : Is Rus- 
sell Swallow a Junior or a Senior? 

"Joe" Gaynor and Betty Oldfield are 

certainly commercial students. Don't ask 

us why, because we didn't have time to 
inquire. 



Special attraction in history and English 
classes: "Pompous orations by 'Professor' 
William J. Foley." 

We w^onder why Lee Mather was hold- 
ing back the order of the rings. Maybe 
Lee was thinking of buying two ! 

Did you know that Arvid Anderson 
plays the trumpet over the radio? No, 
neither did we! 

We hope that the whole "Oracle" staff 
will be able to attend the next League 
meeting. 

Please note Grace Ginnetty's profile. It 
has been said that it's a duplicate to that 
of Norma Shearer. Honest! 

Here's a conundrum to the listeners of 
our radio audience: Who is going to lead 
the Grande March? 

We often wonder what kind of flowers 
Dan Daly is going to carry in the March. 

Did you ever notice "Skipper" when she 
becomes hysterically inclined? The old 
hanky certainly comes in handy, eh, 
"Skip"? 

It isn't true. Grace Hurley and Lou 
Boyle are not reducing. 

The aristocrat of the Sophomore Class, 
Jackie IMulhall, is the great Dorchester 
attraction to under classmen. 

We wonder what "red" gold is made 
of? 

Watch out, Victor, use rubber gloves 
next time! 

Mr. Powderly certainly believes in tem- 
perature to the utmost! 

Don't look twice, under classmen. They 
are actually red garters that the Senior 
girls and boys are wearing on their arms. 
A secret society and it certainly has created 
a lot of curiosity! 



28 



STETSON ORACLE 



Unusiial Fashions 
for Young Moderns 

And when we say "unusual," we mean unusual from 
the standpoint of quality and low price as well as style! 
For EDGAR'S Apparel Shops are just filled with the smart- 
est of new Spring clothes that are as pleasing to your pocket- 
hook as they are to your eye! You'll love the new and 
slightly more fitted silhouette, as expressed in military coats 
and stunning dresses . . . hut we can't possibly tell you all 
ahout them here, so come in and he tempted ! It's perfectly 
safe, because the prices are keyed to a school-girl's budget! 



APPAREL SHOPS 



SECOND FLOOR 



JAMES EDGAR COMPANY 



A BROCKTON INSTITUTION 



COHEN BROTHERS 

CLEANSERS AND DYERS 

We Have a New Line of 

READY-TO-WEAR SUITS 
and TOPCOATS 

Call and Delivery Tel. Ran. 0611 

Estabhshed 1907 



Compliments of 



CLARK 

FRESH FRUITS 

and 
VEGETABLES 



Mrs. Walter Cartwright 



J. Jos. Hurley 



CARTWRIGHT & HURLEY 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



15 North Main St. 



Telephone Conn. 



Randolph, Mass. 



STETSON ORACLE 



29 



"Hooly Rah! Hooly Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Hooly!" has been a cheer heard lately at 
all our home basketball games. Many are 
curious to know who "Hooly" is; ask 
"Gin," she knows. 

Mulhall played basketball for the first 
time at the School for the Deaf game and 
only made ten fouls ! That wasn't bad. 
Keep up your courage, Jack. 

Even the "bright" can be dumb. We 
told Ellen Cohen that the Lindbergh baby 
was found in a church steeple, the bells 
tolled. It was quite a time until the dawn 
came. 

"This social life is terrible!" exclaimed 
those "society debs" in the Junior Class. 
You know, they throw a party every week 
to keep "that gang" together. We under- 
stand that Holbrook is well represented ! 

Sweet sixteen and never been missed — 
Marjorie Aylott. 

May we present the four bright lights of 
the commercial seniors — Evelyn Landberg, 
Gladys Yates, Rita Nelson and Mildred 
Condon. 

We wonder when the "Three Musket- 
eers," Sping, Spud and Speed will stop 
telling their jokes? 

And now, since we must close, we the 
"Two Loveys" take this opportunity to 
thank the members of the "Oracle" staff 
for so graciously helping the advertising 
managers in soliciting their ads. 

Goodbye, everj^one, this is the "Two 
Loveys" signing off — !!! 

Crash— Bang!!!!!! 

* * * 

THE CHATTERBOX 

Has Jerome Shea's "dream girl" fair 
skin and dark eyes? 

Has there been a day that Frank Camp- 
bell hasn't been tardy? 

We often wonder what would happen if 
Mr. Norton didn't wear a black tie? 

* * * 

EXTRA! 

" Boolah" ■ Maho7iey Gets Into Society! 



It is rumored that William Mahoney is 
gaining great fame in the world of sport 
as a cheer leader. Report has it that after 
a fine exhibition at one of the Hingham 
basketball games, he was invited to attend 
a convention of cheer leaders to be held at 
Braintree at an unknown date. We won- 
der if "Boolah" will go! 

We hear Rita Nelson likes the wide 
open spaces. She'll be going west next to 
see one of the Rangers! 

Wliat would happen if Emily Rhodes 
couldn't sing? 

Bill Foley surely held on to Mildred 
Condon at the football dance. 

* * * 

Famous Sayings of Weil-Known People: 

Radio Operator "I'll tell the world." 

Murderer "Well I'll be hanged." 

Judge "Fine." 

Telephone Girl. . ."I've got your number." 

Sausage Maker "I'll be doggone." 

Fisherman "I'll drop you a line." 

* * * 

Someone says: "We need a spectacular 
president." 

Will "Andy" get a girl who can cook? 

Here's luck to Mr. Norton: "May he 
never fall off his sandwich!" 

Found : Bill Foley holding hands with 
Veronica Gaynor down in chemistry ! 

» * * 

Mr. Gardiner said 

His car didn't skid. 
This monument shows 

It could, and did. 

* * * 

And then there was the sap "Soph" who 
took three extra subjects so he would have 
more chance of passing one! 

* * * 

JOKES 

Junior: "How are you as a conversa- 
tionalist?" 

Senior: "Wonderful! I can express less 
in more words than anyone I ever met." 



30 STETSON ORACLE 



GIBSON HUDSON -ESSEX CO. 

"The Car that Sets the Pace" 



CRAWFORD SQUARE 
RANDOLPH 



RANDOLPH NEWS CO., Inc. 

H. R. HARRINGTON, Manager 

HAVE YOUR PAPER DELIVERED, Morning, Evening Sunday 

PLYMOUTH ROCK ICE CREAM, CANDY, TOBACCO, NEWSPAPERS 

— "BEST LINE OF MAGAZINES" — 
105 North Main Street, McAiilifTe Block Tel. 0280 



W. F. DUGGAN 

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Telephone Randolph 657 

HOLBROOK MASSACHUSETTS 

Compliments of 

DR. H. N. SMITH 

DENTIST 

Evenings and Sundays by Appointment 

331 NORTH MAIN STREET 
Telephone, Office 0471 Residence 0300 



STETSON ORACLE 31 



F. Campbell: "What's the best way to R. McGrorj': "Yes, quite calm, but he's 
kill ants?" never been collected." 

A. Madan: "Hit your uncle's wife on * * * 

the head with a hammer!" Miss Gavin: "Anna, did you take a 

* * * shower?" 

M. Condon: "You know, Washington Anna Sullivan: "No, is there one miss- 
never told a lie?" ing?" 

G. Yates: "But he went into politics * * * 

when the country was new!" Mr. Norton: "What was the Greek 

* * * name for Vulcan ?" 

D. McLea: "Dan, how do you like cod Helen Porter: "Volcano!" 

fish balls?" * * * 

D. Daley: "I don't know, I've never Mule in the barnyard, lazy and sick, 

been to any!" Boy with a pin on the end of a stick, 

* * * Boy gave a jab, mule gave a lurch, 

F. Baker: "I want a pair of corduroy Services Monday in the Methodist 

pants." Church! 

Salesman: "How long?" ' * * * 

F. Baker: "How long? I don't want "I've always been religiously inclined," 

to rent them, I want to buy them." mused the oyster as he slid down the min- 

* * * ister's throat, "but I never dreamed I 

n-i u- u- ui V J A 11 should enter the clergy." 

1 he urchm was highiy excited, and well ^■' 

he might be when we considered his ex- * * * 

planation: "They got twins up to sister's. "Your teeth are like the stars," he said. 

One twin, he's a boy, the other twin she's And pressed her hand so white, 

a girl, an' so I'm a uncle an' a aunt!" And he spoke true, for, like the stars, 



* * * 



Her teeth came out at night! 

* * * 



Then there was the Scotchman in the 
football stadium who jumped up and ^ "^^" tourmg Europe sent back a pic- 
shouted: "Hey, you! Get that quarter- ^"''^ post-card bearing the message: 
back!" "^^^^ Son: 

* * * "On the other side you will see a pic- 

D. Doyle: "Do vou know whv vour ^""^ °^ ^^' '''''^ ^^°"^ ^hich the Spartans 

hair has so much electricity?" "^l'/ ^° ^^'■°''' ^^'^' defective children. 

O. White: "No, why?" ^''^ -^'"^ '''''' ^''^■" 

D. Doyle: "Because it is attached to a 

dry cell." ^^'^^ Cohen : "Did you know my uncle 



* * * 



* * * 



had a wooden leg?" 



Joe Shea: "Can you see any change in ^^''nJce W. : "That's nothing, my sis- 

ter has a cedar chest." 



me?" 

A. Maguire: "I don't." 

Joe Shea: "Well, you ought to, I just 
swallowed a dime!" 

* * * 

A. Conrad : "They say Pete was calm 
and collected after his accident." 



* * * 




3-2 



STETSON ORACLE 



Co??ipIi/ne?its of 


WEBSTER'S 


"DICK'' CONDON 




Hy-Grade 


HOME MADE ICE CREAM 


GROCERIES, CANDY 

ICE CREAM, ETC. 

"M^E AIM TO PLEASE'' 


M'e Can't Make All the 

Ice Cream Made, 
So ive Make Only the Best 


Open 8 A. M. to 10 P. M. 


STOUGHTON, MASS. 


Tel. RAN. 0822 58 UNION ST. 


Tel. 370 



"The Stetson Oracle" 
wishes success 



to the 
Junior Play Cast 




•••'^■C UNDERMILL PRESS >#■• 



ESTABLISHED 1872 



PRINTERS OF BOOKS M.WA7JNES y STATIONERY 



388 Bowdone Sitreet, 



Oorclhesiterg Maisacheseitits 



PATRONIZE 



The Senior Play 



"Here Comes Patricia" 



By Eugene Hafer 



m^t< 



A Walter H. Baker Play 



■^ <«»» ^ 



Under the Direction of 

MR. HENRY HARMON 



^-♦« 



To Be Presented 



May 6 in Stetson Hall